SD-WAN Featured Article

TelePacific Communications Reveals Full Plans for a Nationwide SD-WAN

July 15, 2016

By Steve Anderson, Contributing Writer

TelePacific Communications (News - Alert) has been working toward something big lately. Back in March, it picked up DSCI, known for its capability in unified communications (UC) and managed IT services. This move allowed TelePacific to form a complete national managed services carrier operation, and its next move was even more impressive. With DSCI's capability to back it, TelePacific recently announced an active pilot program for a complete nationwide software-defined wide area networking (SD-WAN) setup.




With such a move in place, TelePacific can bring its line of premium services to customers who aren't actually on TelePacific's network, essentially providing on an Over the Top (OTT) basis. The pilot program is bringing several services—TelePacific's hosted private branch exchange (PBX (News - Alert)), multiprotocol label switching (MPLS), and continuity solutions—to customers in Colorado, Florida, New York, Oklahoma, Texas and Washington. There's no word about when the program will expand to other states not only the TelePacific network, but it's a safe bet that that's a development to follow.

Meanwhile, TelePacific's director of network architecture and security Jared Martin commented “This opens up tremendous possibilities for us, as a managed services carrier, and for our customers, who can now simplify, secure and supercharge their communications. One of our customers needed to bring up a new site and connect it to their existing TelePacific MPLS network, but the site was outside of our traditional footprint. With SD-WAN we are able to securely tunnel all of their MPLS traffic through our gateway back to the TelePacific core and connect it to their private MPLS network of sites.”

It's easy to see why this is a great move for TelePacific. It's increased its potential customer network by a sizable number, and made its services available for a lot more users to get in on. That in turn means a much greater potential revenue stream, and a greatly improved cash flow besides. TelePacific can find a larger pool of users, offer a terrific systems package, and gain a whole load of dedicated, loyal customers that will stick with TelePacific when new services emerge. It's not enough, of course, to just be able to access that larger market. TelePacific has to be ready to back up the range with the best in services. As long as it can maintain quality, however, it should have plenty of happy customers eager for more access to services.

TelePacific is giving itself a great opportunity to expand its operations and its revenue. It's got to make good on that opportunity to succeed, but it's got a great proposition going in, which should be enough to keep it going in the end. 




Edited by Maurice Nagle


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