SD-WAN Featured Article

Citrix SD-WAN Release Tackles Scale

May 18, 2018

By Ken Briodagh, Editorial Director

SD-WAN networks can scale and accommodate future growth for distributed enterprises and must make sure that users maintain connectivity while improving security and providing end-to-end visibility.

Citrix’s (News - Alert) new version of NetScaler SD-WAN is designed to increase WAN throughput while accelerating enterprise applications, the company said. With the recent release of NetScaler SD-WAN 10.0, Citrix said it wanted to make sure that its customers can operate their networks at scale. The release introduced the concept of regions to the product, which reportedly will enable customers to subdivide networks into smaller sub-networks that can be organized regionally and be used to group sites of a similar size, function, or network design, up to 550 sites per region.




IP multi-cast is also enabled with the new version so digital displays and other massive data distribution activities can be handled within the software.

This release also introduces a new management portal for evaluating the entire network at-a-glance, looking for trouble spots. The combination of the integrated firewall in NetScaler SD-WAN, a frequently updated library of over 4000 applications, and policy-based application steering makes it easy to identify applications and block or send application traffic directly to the Internet, reducing the impact of those applications on the WAN while maintaining security.

Of course, if any customer doesn’t want to manage the network themselves, Citrix says it’s ready to help there, too. The company has a large and growing portfolio of managed service providers that offer Citrix SD-WAN as a service, including Citrix Solution Providers like RapidScale that have added managed SD-WAN to their other applications services.


Ken Briodagh is a writer and editor with more than a decade of experience under his belt. He is in love with technology and if he had his druthers would beta test everything from shoe phones to flying cars.

Edited by Ken Briodagh


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